Beach Bocce

Here’s a tranquil scene from a past shore vacation. Bocce on the beach, a competitive sport played in a relaxed setting with no time limits.

This was painted from a photo I took of a very pleasant evening; the sun was setting behind us; in front, a cool ocean breeze drifted across the waves; and beverage refills were an arms’ length away.

Watercolors and gouache on Arches paper.

Figure Friday

Here is our lovely figure model in a gorgeous ten minute pose that I first rendered in pencil and afterwards converted it to a watercolor sketch. I’m compiling quite a volume of drawings from her work.

Quick Sketch

It took a bit longer than “quick” for me to draw a portrait of one of our stalwart figure models (more like 40 minutes), but once I drew it in pencil, it was easy to create a watercolor sketch from it. This is painted fast and loose in order to keep the spontaneous look and feel of water media.

Context

Years ago, a former figure drawing professor of mine commented that he never saw me draw a background on any of my figure drawings. Well, here is a figure plus background. I call her “Renaissance Girl”. This lovely model is also an artist, has traveled to Italy and has an interest in Renaissance art. Thus the Botticelli-esque background.

Solstice

Winter is officially here, but our only snowfall to date has already melted away. While waiting for the next one, I came across a photograph depicting an elderly couple strolling through the snow in Central Park in New York City. Here’s my copy of it.

Almost Winter

Outside, the season’s first snowfall is still partially covering the ground, but I thought I’d sneak in one more image of fall before the winter solstice is upon us. I tried to make this one a pure watercolor, but I ended up overworking it. So, I reached for the gouache to fix it and lost some luminosity in the process. Painting management! Will have to redo this at a future date.

Fall color

A telltale sign of fall is the crimson color of Euonymus alatus, otherwise known as burning bush. The key to its intense color is sunlight. The greater the exposure, the deeper the color. There is a row of these bushes along the Wyomissing trail that lies mostly in the shadow of the surrounding trees. One can readily see where the sun breaks through by the intensity of color on the tops of the bushes.